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fredag 25. juli 2014

Psykolog blant ebola-smitta i Sierra Leone


Ebola in Sierra Leone: battling sadness, fear and disgust on the frontline

An MSF psychologist reveals the trauma of dealing with the Ebola outbreak for medics, cleaners and the families of the dead
MDG ebola in sierra Leone
An MSF worker puts on protective gear at the isolation ward of the Donka Hospital in Conakry, where people with Ebola are being treated. Photograph: Cellou Binani/AFP/Getty Images

Ane Bjøru Fjeldsæter is a 31-year-old psychologist from Trondheim, Norway. For the past month, she has been working for Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) in Kailahun, Sierra Leone, helping to fightthe largest ever outbreak of Ebola, which has killed more than 600 people in three countries. She provides support and counselling to patients and their families, as well as to the staff whose job it is to deal with the dead bodies.

I was expecting the Ebola epidemic to be quite gruesome and unlike anything I had seen before. But I really didn't expect its magnitude – this outbreak is enormous. In Sierra Leone, it killed off a lot of health workers before MSF even arrived. Not surprisingly, medical staff were reluctant to work with us at first. They'd never come across Ebola before – but at least they had previous experience of people suffering and people dying. But for the non-medical staff, like the hygienists – our hospital cleaners – it's been a new and disturbing experience, and a large part of my work involves helping them with counselling and support.

The hygienists have the hardest job of all because they are the ones dealing with the dead bodies. Since our Ebola centre opened two weeks ago, we've had 37 deaths: an average of two or three a day. A lot of the cleaners are young, unskilled workers. In an area with an unemployment rate of 95%, they jumped at this opportunity to get a job.

They are the ones who mop up the vomit, the stools and the blood. And when there's a death, they are the ones who retrieve the body from the isolation ward, put it in the morgue and disinfect it. In the final stages of the disease, the viral load increases massively, which means the dead bodies are extremely contagious and very dangerous to deal with.

MDG : MSF Ebola Treatment Centre in Kailahun, Sierra Leone
Doctors try to feed a girl in the centre's high-contamination-risk zone. Photograph: Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos for MSF

Dealing with the dead bodies is disturbing: the hygienists experience feelings of sadness and fear, but also disgust. When Ebola patients die, there's bleeding, vomiting and diarrhoea. The cleaners tell me they have flashbacks of the things they have seen and of things they have smelled. Even wearing a mask, you can't shut out all the smells.

Traditionally, in Sierra Leone, dead bodies are taken care of by the tribal elders. A lot of the hygienists feel they are too young to be dealing with the dead, so worry they're being disrespectful of their culture's traditions. We make sure that on each shift there is always one man and one woman, so that when someone dies, there will always be someone of the same sex to tend to them.

The local staff experience huge stigma from the community. The son of one of our workers recently died from malaria. People in his village immediately said he had caused his son's death because he was working with Ebola. It was very distressing for him.

The stigma makes it hard for the hygienists. We tell them: "You are heroes, you're doing a very important service for your community – it's absolutely vital that someone is doing this job." But although we see them as heroes, that isn't always how they are perceived by their families, their friends or their villages.

MDG : MSF Ebola Treatment Centre in Kailahun. Sierra Leone
A patient attempts to rehydrate himself under the watchful eye of a nurse. Photograph: Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos for MSF

When we discharge a patient who has survived Ebola, it makes an enormous difference to them. On Tuesday, three people who had been cured were discharged from the isolation ward, and all the cleaners were dancing, deliriously happy and taking photographs. They find ways to manage the stress: they take good care of each other; when someone is upset, they talk about it, and they are very open about voicing their concerns and difficulties.

Still, the local staff have had their lives turned upside down. But then throughout the entire district everything is upside down. Here in Kailahun, the banks are shut, the schools have been closed for more than a month, and the students are very upset that they are missing their exams. A lot of people are isolated by the fear that if they go near other people, they will get the disease. People are at a loss to understand what is happening to them.

Last week, a girl came out of the isolation ward. Her name was Bintu and she was almost two. Both her parents had tested positive for Ebola, but she tested negative, so we had to take her out of the ward because the risk of contamination was too high. That was a horrible day.

MDG : MSF psychologist Ane Bjøru Fjeldsæter at Ebola Treatment Centre in Kailahun, Sierra Leone
Psychologist Ane Bjøru Fjeldsæter welcomes Tamba James, who has been tested negative for Ebola. Photograph: Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos for MSF

The nurses told me she didn't know how to speak. For the two days she'd been in the ward, she'd been so shocked that she hadn't uttered a word. This can happen to children – it's called elective mutism. When she came out, she was in shock: she didn't make eye contact; she didn't speak to anyone. We put her in a chair and she turned around, with her back to the world.

It must have been a terribly disturbing experience for a child: to see someone come into the ward in a spacesuit; to hear them speaking to her mother in words she didn't understand; to see her mother start crying; and then to be handed over to the stranger in the spacesuit and carried off.

I sat with her for four hours, trying to talk to her in a calm and normal voice and singing her songs, to see if the shock would pass. By the end of the four hours she had turned around and was facing me. She made eye contact, she put her hand out for me to touch her, she tried to start a conversation with me. You could see that she was starting to warm up to me, and that she wasn't in the same condition.

Bintu became an orphan that day. She is in the care of our child protection partner and they will locate other family members who can take care of her. She will need to be monitored for 21 days to see that she does not develop the disease herself.

http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/poverty-matters/2014/jul/17/ebola-sierra-leone-epidemic

Psykolog blant ebola-smitta i Sierra Leone


Ebola in Sierra Leone: battling sadness, fear and disgust on the frontline

An MSF psychologist reveals the trauma of dealing with the Ebola outbreak for medics, cleaners and the families of the dead
MDG ebola in sierra Leone
An MSF worker puts on protective gear at the isolation ward of the Donka Hospital in Conakry, where people with Ebola are being treated. Photograph: Cellou Binani/AFP/Getty Images

Ane Bjøru Fjeldsæter is a 31-year-old psychologist from Trondheim, Norway. For the past month, she has been working for Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) in Kailahun, Sierra Leone, helping to fightthe largest ever outbreak of Ebola, which has killed more than 600 people in three countries. She provides support and counselling to patients and their families, as well as to the staff whose job it is to deal with the dead bodies.

I was expecting the Ebola epidemic to be quite gruesome and unlike anything I had seen before. But I really didn't expect its magnitude – this outbreak is enormous. In Sierra Leone, it killed off a lot of health workers before MSF even arrived. Not surprisingly, medical staff were reluctant to work with us at first. They'd never come across Ebola before – but at least they had previous experience of people suffering and people dying. But for the non-medical staff, like the hygienists – our hospital cleaners – it's been a new and disturbing experience, and a large part of my work involves helping them with counselling and support.

The hygienists have the hardest job of all because they are the ones dealing with the dead bodies. Since our Ebola centre opened two weeks ago, we've had 37 deaths: an average of two or three a day. A lot of the cleaners are young, unskilled workers. In an area with an unemployment rate of 95%, they jumped at this opportunity to get a job.

They are the ones who mop up the vomit, the stools and the blood. And when there's a death, they are the ones who retrieve the body from the isolation ward, put it in the morgue and disinfect it. In the final stages of the disease, the viral load increases massively, which means the dead bodies are extremely contagious and very dangerous to deal with.

MDG : MSF Ebola Treatment Centre in Kailahun, Sierra Leone
Doctors try to feed a girl in the centre's high-contamination-risk zone. Photograph: Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos for MSF

Dealing with the dead bodies is disturbing: the hygienists experience feelings of sadness and fear, but also disgust. When Ebola patients die, there's bleeding, vomiting and diarrhoea. The cleaners tell me they have flashbacks of the things they have seen and of things they have smelled. Even wearing a mask, you can't shut out all the smells.

Traditionally, in Sierra Leone, dead bodies are taken care of by the tribal elders. A lot of the hygienists feel they are too young to be dealing with the dead, so worry they're being disrespectful of their culture's traditions. We make sure that on each shift there is always one man and one woman, so that when someone dies, there will always be someone of the same sex to tend to them.

The local staff experience huge stigma from the community. The son of one of our workers recently died from malaria. People in his village immediately said he had caused his son's death because he was working with Ebola. It was very distressing for him.

The stigma makes it hard for the hygienists. We tell them: "You are heroes, you're doing a very important service for your community – it's absolutely vital that someone is doing this job." But although we see them as heroes, that isn't always how they are perceived by their families, their friends or their villages.

MDG : MSF Ebola Treatment Centre in Kailahun. Sierra Leone
A patient attempts to rehydrate himself under the watchful eye of a nurse. Photograph: Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos for MSF

When we discharge a patient who has survived Ebola, it makes an enormous difference to them. On Tuesday, three people who had been cured were discharged from the isolation ward, and all the cleaners were dancing, deliriously happy and taking photographs. They find ways to manage the stress: they take good care of each other; when someone is upset, they talk about it, and they are very open about voicing their concerns and difficulties.

Still, the local staff have had their lives turned upside down. But then throughout the entire district everything is upside down. Here in Kailahun, the banks are shut, the schools have been closed for more than a month, and the students are very upset that they are missing their exams. A lot of people are isolated by the fear that if they go near other people, they will get the disease. People are at a loss to understand what is happening to them.

Last week, a girl came out of the isolation ward. Her name was Bintu and she was almost two. Both her parents had tested positive for Ebola, but she tested negative, so we had to take her out of the ward because the risk of contamination was too high. That was a horrible day.

MDG : MSF psychologist Ane Bjøru Fjeldsæter at Ebola Treatment Centre in Kailahun, Sierra Leone
Psychologist Ane Bjøru Fjeldsæter welcomes Tamba James, who has been tested negative for Ebola. Photograph: Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos for MSF

The nurses told me she didn't know how to speak. For the two days she'd been in the ward, she'd been so shocked that she hadn't uttered a word. This can happen to children – it's called elective mutism. When she came out, she was in shock: she didn't make eye contact; she didn't speak to anyone. We put her in a chair and she turned around, with her back to the world.

It must have been a terribly disturbing experience for a child: to see someone come into the ward in a spacesuit; to hear them speaking to her mother in words she didn't understand; to see her mother start crying; and then to be handed over to the stranger in the spacesuit and carried off.

I sat with her for four hours, trying to talk to her in a calm and normal voice and singing her songs, to see if the shock would pass. By the end of the four hours she had turned around and was facing me. She made eye contact, she put her hand out for me to touch her, she tried to start a conversation with me. You could see that she was starting to warm up to me, and that she wasn't in the same condition.

Bintu became an orphan that day. She is in the care of our child protection partner and they will locate other family members who can take care of her. She will need to be monitored for 21 days to see that she does not develop the disease herself.

http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/poverty-matters/2014/jul/17/ebola-sierra-leone-epidemic

tirsdag 22. juli 2014

"SPONSET VIDEO: Not Sorry | #ShineStrong Pantene"



Info: Sorry, NOT SORRY for asking you to watch this video. After all, why are women always apologizing? Sure, it's polite to say "sorry" sometimes. But for everything? No way. Be confident and #ShineStrong!


As women, we weaken our own strength (in ways men never do) at work, at home, during moments in between. Sorry is more than just one, little, reflex word. Please share with the women who shine in your life and help Pantene empower women everywhere. Because when you're strong on the inside, you shine on the outside. And that's a beautiful thing. Don't be sorry. Be strong and shine. Go to http://www.pantene.com/shinestrong to learn more.


<script type="text/javascript" src=http://video.unrulymedia.com/wildfire_202369331.js"></script>



- Posted using BlogPress from my iPad

lørdag 19. juli 2014

På campen






Dan sitt vi på Campen og koser oss med Bernoff i bakgrunnen. Sola steiker og livet er herlig. Meg og Solhild har overnatta i Hagen til Nils, eg meg ullbukse og strikke genser eg fikk låne av Monica. Igår var vi på masse konserter på tross av kulde om kvelden. Vi har prata med masse folk og også vore for å sjå camplivet. Mottoet er grønn festival, så det er reine toalett og søppel blir rydda vekk fortløpende. Ikkje verst, syns eg. 

fredag 18. juli 2014

Malakoff 2014

Sitt og venter på at klokka skal bli tre slik at eg og Solhild kan komme oss på veien som leder strakt til rocke-paradis. Ikkje at eg liker rock spesielt godt, men eg liker menneska som samles for å høre på. Dessutan skal ylvis og Bernhof vere der, og etter å ha hørt gjennom den sistnevnte si plate, gleder eg meg til det. Mange kjente skal vere på festivalen og eg er jo glad i å møte nye mennesker og! Imens eg venter ser eg på orange is the New black og nyter friheten. Eg ser også gjennom gamle bilder, og må le litt for meg sjølv. Litt har då eg og mine kjære forandra seg i åras løp! 

onsdag 16. juli 2014

Take time to Explore

I det siste har eg jobba mykje med lerret. Eg bruker akrylmaling, crackle paint, gesso, papir, servietter, decoupagelim, utstansa blomstrer og klokker (fra dies) og pynt som eg har samla opp over tid. Denne gangen har eg brukt mest grønn farge, med litt oransj innimellom.

Crackle paint, oransj band og grønn blomst
Klokke-dies fra Tim Holz, fargelagt med gesso, grøn akrylmaling og dekorert med glitter
Heile bildet. Forskjellige lag med papir, servietter og bånd


Utfordringer:
http://craftingfromtheheartchallengeblog.blogspot.no/ - Anything goes - 21/7.
http://imagination-craftschallenges.blogspot.no/ - Anything goes - 31/7
- Crafty Catz - Challenge 237 - Anything Goes
- Crafty Sentiments Designs - Summer/Summer Colours
- 7 Kids College Fund - Challenge # 102 - Anything Goes

Monument

Eg har lyst på Øya-festivalen. Robyn har vore en favoritt av meg i mange år, og eg har allereie høyrt på "Monument" og "Do it again" så mange ganger at det er rart eg ikkje er lei. Om det ikkje blir øya-festival, skal eg likevel på malakoff og utkant, og bruker tida til å forberede meg på det. Eg sender rundt mailer til artistene som skal opptre, og krysser fingrene for fleire intervju.
Drømmen er selfølgelig å intervjue Robyn.

Her er teksten eg sender. Om nokon kjenner artister, eller meiner teksten bør jobbes med, ta gjerne kontakt.

Eg er en psykolog som har starta eit prosjekt som forsker på kvifor vi gjer gode gjerninger. Eg reiser rundt og intervjuer både vanlige folk på gata og kjente personer om dette. Eg har fått lov til å intervjue artistene som skal opptre på utkantfestivalen, og håper det vil bli mogeleg å Intervjue ....
Intervjuet tar kun fem minutt, og spørsmåla eg stiller er:

1. Kva er det snillaste du har gjort for nokon andre (gjerne fremmede) ?
2. Kva er grunnen til at du gjer snille snille ting?
3. Kva er det snilleste en fremmed eller nokon du kjenner, har gjort mot deg?




Nokre av intervjua blir publisert på http://lovefreepsychology.blogspot.no.


Mvh
Nina Erikstad
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tirsdag 15. juli 2014

Never just black or white

or white


Eyes of the black cat
Eyes of the black cat


Beluga


Photo | by Ian Sirenko
Photo | by Ian Sirenko


// volcan // lave // neige //
// volcan // lave // neige //


Ruben Ireland
Ruben Ireland


Motherhood.
Motherhood.


© Antonio Mora, Black cliff, 2013, digital collage
© Antonio Mora, Black cliff, 2013, digital collage


B&W portrait
B&W portrait


Lee Jeffries
Lee Jeffries

Dance
Dance


This is amazing.
This is amazing.


Doves in spring
Doves in spring


Spring Blossoms, Sweden
Spring Blossoms, Sweden


Happy memories of Dad bundling the five of us kids up in PJs and blankets and his driving us to the Tidal Basin in DC to watch the sunrise through the cherry blossoms while we sipped OJ that he had squeezed that morning.
Happy memories of Dad bundling the five of us kids up in PJs and blankets and his driving us to the Tidal Basin in DC to watch the sunrise through the cherry blossoms while we sipped OJ that he had squeezed that morning.


La vita è bella: Se meg
La vita è bella: Se meg


NEW YORK CITY—1950.  © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos.
NEW YORK CITY—1950. © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos.




white
white


Photo prise le : 28 avril 2012. Saint-Merri, Paris, Île-de-France, France by bpixel
Photo prise le : 28 avril 2012. Saint-Merri, Paris, Île-de-France, France by bpixel


Paris 1968 Photo: Henri Cartier-Bresson
Paris 1968 Photo: Henri Cartier-Bresson


Henri Cartier Bresson
Henri Cartier Bresson


Henri Cartier-Bresson
Henri Cartier-Bresson


Henri Cartier Bresson
Henri Cartier Bresson

Henri Cartier Bresson
Henri Cartier Bresson


lifes dance
lifes dance


Another flying baby!
Another flying baby!


Love
Love


simple
simple

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La vita è bella

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